The Prince and the Dark Horse

There was once a young prince who, having reached the age of majority, left home to live on a grand estate given to him by his father. He was told that if he ever needed help he was to put a light in the uppermost tower window, and his father would send a special horse and carriage to carry him to safety.

However, his father also warned him that an evil wizard, an enemy of the kingdom, lived not too far from his new home. The prince was told to be wary when setting his signal, for this wizard would also see this light and might himself send his own horse and carriage to carry the prince off to who knows what kind of danger.

Of course, this frightened the young ruler-to-be. After all, how would he be able to tell the difference? His father assured him there was a foolproof measure. Each time, before entering the rescue carriage, he was to closely examine the horse pulling it. A light-colored horse would always take him to safety, but a dark horse would always take him to danger.

As one might imagine, many of the ordeals that come with the ruling life befell the prince, each one causing him to put a light in the window. And for many months, because he was in such a rush to escape his castle when he felt in danger, he failed to heed his father’s warning; time and time again he neglected to examine the horse that came to get him. As a result he often found himself on one painful wild ride after another where, too late, he realized his inattentiveness was causing him as much distress as the condition he was trying to escape.

Eventually, he found the presence of mind-before he would get into the carriage that had come for him-to see if the horse pulling it had been sent by the evil wizard or by his father.

Reflection Questions

  • When you feel scared or distressed, who or what is your ‘dark horse’?
  • What usually happens to you (internally or externally) when you go with that ‘dark horse’?
  • Imagine that every time you instead choose to go with the ‘white horse.’ How might your life look and feel differently?

I hope you’ve enjoyed this story from Guy Finley. Also remember to Click Here and you’ll be able to listen to 30 minutes of audio from his best-selling album “The Secrets of Being Unstoppable.”

Advertisements

The Dog, the Stick and the Sufi

A man dressed as a Sufi was walking along one day when he saw a dog on the road, which he struck hard with his staff. The dog, yelping with pain, ran to the great sage Abu-Said. Throwing himself at his feet and holding up his injured paw, he called for justice against the Sufi who had maltreated him so cruelly.

The wise one called them together. To the Sufi, he said: “O heedless one! How is it possible for you to treat a dumb animal in this manner? Look at what you have done!”

The Sufi answered: “Far from its being my fault, it is that of the dog. I did not strike him from a mere whim, but for the reason that he had fouled my robe.”

But the dog persisted in his complaint.

Then the peerless one addressed the dog: “Rather than waiting for the Ultimate Compensation, allow me to give you a compensation for your pain.”

The dog said: “Great and wise done! When I saw this man garbed as a Sufi, I was able to conclude that he would do me no harm. Had I seen instead a man wearing ordinary dress, I would naturally have given him a wide berth. My real mistake was to assume that the outward appearance of a man of truth indicated safety. If you desire his punishment, take away from him the garment of the Elect. Deprive him of the costume of the People of Righteousness…”

Reflection Questions

  • When in your life have you been deceived by another person’s appearance?
  • What happened as a result of your incorrect assumption?
  • Why did you make that assumption?
  • If you made no assumptions about that person, how might your interaction with that person have been different?

I hope you’ve enjoyed this story.

Digging A Way Out

Stones on a Rocky Ocean Beach

Stones on a Rocky Ocean Beach

There’s a man who has been by himself in a prison cell with a dirt floor, crude stone walls, and there’s two windows one of which looks out towards the ocean. All of the sudden, he hears a scratching noise, and he looks down at the ground that is furthest away from the window facing the ocean. He sees the ground moving, and he starts to think he’s losing his mind. But soon the ground breaks, and up pops a head with long hair and a beard… it’s a prisoner.

And the prisoner says “Sssh. Listen. A group of us have been tunneling for about six years, and we’ve finally reached your cell. We have ways to cover up my entrance into this, but now it’s all on your shoulders, man. All you have to do,” he said while pointing out the window towards the ocean, “you just start digging here and go down about six feet and about 75 feet in that direction and there is freedom, and we’re outta here!”

“Oh, I love that! That’s great; I want to be free!”

“Okay, I’ll check back with you in a few weeks.”

Two weeks later, the pops back in to check on his friend’s progress, and his friend nods back with great affirmation. “Yeah, I’ve done it.”

So the man who was providing the instructions pops down the hole, and two seconds later pops right back up and says, “What have you done?!?!?”

“Huh?”

“I told you to dig in the direction towards the OCEAN! This tunnel that you dug goes back under the wall and into the prison yard.”

“Well, the digging was easier in the other direction…”

Reflection Questions:-

  • In your life right now,what is one way you are digging in the “easy” direction?
  • How might your life be different if you were to dig towards the metaphorical “ocean”?
  • What tools or resources would enable you to dig in the direction of the “ocean” more often?

The Real Meaning Of Peace

There once was a king who offered a prize to the artist who would paint the best picture of peace. Many artists tried. The king looked at all the pictures.

But there were only two he really liked, and he had to choose between them. One picture was of a calm lake. The lake was a perfect mirror for peaceful towering mountains all around it. Overhead was a blue sky with fluffy white clouds. All who saw this picture thought that it was a perfect picture of peace.

The other picture had mountains, too. But these were rugged and bare. Above was an angry sky, from which rain fell and in which lightning played. Down the side of the mountain tumbled a foaming waterfall. This did not look peaceful at all.

But when the king looked closely, he saw behind the waterfall a tiny bush growing in a crack in the rock. In the bush a mother bird had built her nest. There, in the midst of the rush of angry water, sat the mother bird on her nest – in perfect peace.

The king chose the second picture.

What do you think about this story?

Share your Comments.

A Single Glass of Water

Just after finishing dinner, with a quick swipe, the teacher intentionally knocked his glass of water onto the floor. Glass shattered everywhere, yet he remained calm.

Meanwhile, his student, Raha, became noticeably upset. With similar upset, an employee begrudgingly began to clean up the water and broken glass. Almost everybody in the restaurant was upset, except for the teacher.

While attempting to hide her anger, Raha asked: “Why did you do that?”

Her teacher replied, “What I do is far less important than what you do. Perhaps it might be more interesting to ask yourself why you feel the way you do right now.”

These words affected Raha so deeply that she was immediately moved to action. Raha helped the employee clean up the mess, and the more Raha helped, the less anger she felt. And the more the teacher watched, the more his eyes filled with tears.

After a few minutes, just as the table and floor had become clean, so had Raha’s heart. With immense gratitude, Raha bowed slightly to her teacher and then walked out the door.

What remained was no longer just a teacher, but rather, also a student once again seeking the Truth.

 

I hope you’ve enjoyed this story. I wish for you a wonderful day!

Just after finishing dinner, with a quick swipe, the teacher intentionally knocked his glass of water onto the floor. Glass shattered everywhere, yet he remained calm.

Meanwhile, his student, Raha, became noticeably upset. With similar upset, an employee begrudgingly began to clean up the water and broken glass. Almost everybody in the restaurant was upset, except for the teacher.

While attempting to hide her anger, Raha asked: “Why did you do that?”

Her teacher replied, “What I do is far less important than what you do. Perhaps it might be more interesting to ask yourself why you feel the way you do right now.”

These words affected Raha so deeply that she was immediately moved to action. Raha helped the employee clean up the mess, and the more Raha helped, the less anger she felt. And the more the teacher watched, the more his eyes filled with tears.

After a few minutes, just as the table and floor had become clean, so had Raha’s heart. With immense gratitude, Raha bowed slightly to her teacher and then walked out the door.

What remained was no longer just a teacher, but rather, also a student once again seeking the Truth.